cataracts
lasik
cornea
retina
glaucoma
cosmetic procedures
comprehensive eye care

Glaucoma

glaucoma-chartGlaucoma is a group of diseases of the optic nerve involving loss of retinal ganglion cells in a characteristic pattern of optic neuropathy. Although raised intraocular pressure is a significant risk factor for developing glaucoma, there is no set threshold for intraocular pressure that causes glaucoma. One person may develop nerve damage at a relatively low pressure, while another person may have high eye pressure for years and yet never develop damage. Untreated glaucoma leads to permanent damage of the optic nerve and resultant visual field loss, which can progress to blindness.

Glaucoma has been nicknamed the “sneaky thief of sight” because the loss of visual field often occurs gradually over a long time and may only be recognized when it is already quite advanced. Once lost, this damaged visual field can never be recovered. Worldwide, it is the second leading cause of blindness. Glaucoma affects one in two hundred people aged fifty and younger, and one in ten over the age of eighty.

Ocular hypertension is the largest risk factor in most glaucomas. Though, in some populations only 50% of patients with primary open angle glaucoma have elevated ocular pressure. Diabetics and those of African descent are three times more likely to develop primary open angle glaucoma. Higher age, thinner corneal thickness, and myopia are also risk factors for primary open angle glaucoma. People with a family history of glaucoma have about a six percent chance of developing glaucoma. Asians are prone to develop angle-closure glaucoma, and Inuit have a twenty to forty times higher risk than caucasians of developing primary angle closure glaucoma. Women are three times more likely than men to develop acute angle-closure glaucoma due to their shallower anterior chambers. Use of steroids can also cause glaucoma.

Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) has been found to be associated with mutations in genes at several loci. Normal tension glaucoma, which comprises one third of POAG, is associated with genetic mutations.

There is increasing evidence of ocular blood flow to be involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Current data indicate that fluctuations in blood flow are more harmful in glaucomatous optic neuropathy than steady reductions. Unstable blood pressure and dips are linked to optic nerve head damage and correlate with visual field deterioration.

A number of studies also suggest that there is a correlation, not necessarily causal, between glaucoma and systemic hypertension (i.e. high blood pressure). In normal tension glaucoma, nocturnal hypotension may play a significant role. On the other hand there is no clear evidence that vitamin deficiencies cause glaucoma in humans, nor that oral vitamin supplementation is useful in glaucoma treatment.

Those at risk for glaucoma are advised to have a dilated eye examination at least once a year.

Are you a Cataract Surgery
Candidate?
Are you a LASIK
Candidate?
Schedule
an Appointment
Learn More About
Financing Options

Our Locations

BRUNSWICK OFFICE

3215 Shrine Road, Suit 6
Brunswick, GA 31520

douglas OFFICE

306 Radcliffe Avenue
Douglas, GA 31533

waycross OFFICE

 2507 Alice Street
Waycross, GA 31501

hinesville OFFICE

556 Oglethorpe Highway
Hinesville, GA 31313

jesup OFFICE

125 W Cherry Street
Jesup, GA 31545

swainsboro OFFICE

125 A Victory Drive
Swainsboro, GA 30401

vidalia OFFICE

206 Maple Drive
Vidalia, GA 30474

st. Mary's OFFICE

775 C. Kings Bay Rd
St. Marys, GA 31558

fernandina beach OFFICE

6 S 14th St
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034

Baxley office

18 Luckie St
Baxley, FL 31513

Callahan, FL

18 Luckie St
Baxley, FL 31513

Contact us

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form